Some shorts for LookLeft and an unpublished exhibition review

Below are some shorts I wrote for LookLeft magazine, and a review of an exhibition about reggae soundsystems which was dropped due to space issues.

‘Jemmy Hope column’ – shorts
LookLeft #8, October 2011

– After sacking 575 workers in Waterford – some of whom actually trained their low cost replacements – TalkTalk have offered an “insulting” redundancy package of four weeks pay for every year worked. At the same time, TalkTalk hosted a lavish bash in an English stately home which cost a mere €2.3 million. Priorities, priorities.

– The Labour Party is celebrating both its centenary and the inauguration of the National Job Bridge internship scheme. They’re looking for someone to work a 30 hour week on the celebrations. This lucky intern will get €50 per week, plus dole. Larkin and Connolly would be proud.

– It’s not all doom and gloom for social welfare recipients. When they’re not trawling the pages of JobBridge.ie looking for an internship that isn’t actually insulting, they can revel in the fact that since 1986 dole payments have risen by princely €143.75. Meanwhile, TDs’ take-home pay rose by a paltry €980. Per week.

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Soundsystem culture: From Kingston to Dublin
LookLeft #9, December 2011 (unpublished)

In November, Dublin’s Little Green Street Gallery played host to a slice of reggae history. Soundsystem: From Jamaica to Europe 1950-1995, created by music historian Ronan Lynch, designer Paula Strzelecka, and artists Freestylee and Mau Mau, explored the history of reggae soundsystem culture.

Soundsystems – collectives of deejays, selectors and technicians – have been the backbone of Jamaican music from ska and rocksteady through to today’s dancehall styles.

Using words and images, and a constant backing track of reggae tunes, the interesting and informative exhibit traced the movement from its roots in Kingston’s ghettos to its influence on the rise of European warehouse parties. Alongside the displays, the documentary Holding On To Jah was screened and gigs featuring the cream of the Irish reggae scene were held in the venue.

Poster Fish Promotions’ Freda Hughes, organiser of the event said: “The positive vibes and sense of community we created is something I hope will live on in future gigs and events”.

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Explore posts in the same categories: capitalism, exhibition review, film, film review, history, Jemmy Hope, music, non-fiction

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